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News

07.11.2014

Finding the perfect Colour Palette for your Home.

My Waterford August 2014 - Mozilla Firefox_2014-11-07_11-48-54

 

Picking colours for your home is a very personal process, it is the most important part of the design process and yet the most daunting for most. Using the few tips that are here will help to make the process a bit easier and hopefully less daunting.

Your first action should be to look at the colour wheel. Here you will see that there are primary, secondary and tertiary colours.

 

The primary colours are red, blue and yellow. They are true colours and cannot be

created by mixing other colours.

 

The secondary colours are orange, green and purple. These colours are formed when

equal parts of 2 primary colours are combined. For example equal parts of red and

yellow make orange. As basic as this is, this is where we begin our colour selections.

 

Tertiary colours are a mixture, in varying parts of secondary and primary colours to

create different hues, as a result the primary and secondary colours become less vivid.

 

To soften or darken these hues, add black to darken or white to soften.

 

When deciding on a colour palette it is a good idea to start with contrasts, light paired with dark. Consider where you want these colours. Is it preferable to have the bright colours on your walls with neutral furniture and fabrics or would you wish for your walls to be the neutral backdrop to bright patterned fabrics or furniture?

 

 The creation of your colour scheme should not begin with your walls as paint is so easy to mix into the exact tone that you want whereas fabrics, furniture and carpets are more difficult to find. Once you have selected your furnishings you can then move on to wall colour.

 

If you’re more comfortable with pale walls, look to your curtains, furnishings, and accessories for added colour. When picking your colours, especially the bolder ones, makes sure they are crisp and the lines are clean. If your style is more subtle, softer, neutral shades should be considered.

 

Testing how colours work together is essential to getting it right. You will need to get all your swatches together in the room (not just in the shop) place all the swatches in the room and look at them in different lights, morning, afternoon and night. You also need to consider adjoining rooms. Will your chosen colours create a flow with the rest of the house and complement to overall scheme? 

 

Lighting is hugely important in the design scheme and should be considered at every stage of the process. Light affects colour, and changes constantly, throughout the day. A room’s truest colours are those found in the daylight hours and the hues will change throughout the day and the seasons as the lighting changes. Different lightings can also change the appearance of colour.

 

Creating an overall flow in a design scheme means you need to start at the beginning. the beginning should be a central room or a front hall. Is there a colour, or a set of colours that you’re particularly fond of? Do you tend to prefer blues, yellows and greens? Start with a colour that best suits you. Then take that colour and look at it several shades and tones lighter and several shades darker. So, for instance, on your colour wheel, you have chosen blue.

 

Pick a dozen or so paint swatches that have varying shades of blue. You like two shades, one has more of a grey undertone and more has more of a green undertone. Perhaps select one hue for the sitting room and the other for the dining. To make them work together choose the same neutral that can be used in both rooms for ceiling or skirting and architraves or both, not brilliant white. It can bring cohesion if you select neutral tones in hallways, landings and connecting spaces. Upstairs and downstairs should be treated as separate entities, using the hall stairs and landing as a neutral backdrop to create cohesion between the two. Bedroom can have very different colours from each other with children's room’s often bright primary colours and adult rooms or guest room being much softer. An en-suite can be painted in different tones to the attached bedroom maybe paint the bedroom in a slightly lighter colour than the en-suite.

 

Creating design schemes for your home should be an enjoyable experience and not a stressful one. The professionals in interiors stores and paint shops are there to help, bring home samples and swatches to hang up around your rooms and take your time to make decisions. The rules of design are guidelines, don’t forget it’s your home and if it looks good to you it’s a design scheme that works.

 

 

 

Top Tip of the Day


Call to AOKI INTERIORS to talk to our experts about selecting the most suitable option for your home.

 

Aoki Interiors

No.1 Parkside,

Carrick-On-Suir,

Co. Tipperary

Tel: 051-614054

Mob: 087-8274049

E-mail: info@aokiinteriors.ie

Web: www.aokiinteriors.ie

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